The new Damariscotta store offers unique yarns and patterns

Linda Perry, owner of Sheepscot Harbor Yarns at 74 Main Street in Damariscotta, stands in front of her most popular product, four different shades of hand-dyed indigo yarn that Perry dyed herself at her home on David Island in Edgecomb. (photo by Evan Houk)

A new business in downtown Damariscotta, Sheepscot Harbor Yarns, offers unique hand-dyed yarns and a variety of patterns and kits for home knitters.

Linda Perry, of Davis Island in Edgecomb, opened her store in the Pine Tree Yarns building at 74 Main Street in June after 20 years showcasing her products at fiber and craft shows.

The most popular product is Perry’s Niche, hand-dyed indigo yarns that come in four different color intensities named after different tides: high, ebb, soft, and low.

Perry uses a small kettle to dye one skein at a time, making about 24 a day. She heats the water to 145 degrees, immerses the wire in it, then steams it and rinses it before letting it dry.

“The ones that I dip in a kettle, it comes out yellow and then within 10 minutes it’s a blue that I can’t control the color of, so it’s always exciting,” Perry said of his color yarn. tide during an interview on Friday, September 10.

The tide names for the specialty yarn are inspired by where Perry lives and works on Davis Island.

Sheepscot Harbor Yarns at 74 Main Street in Damariscotta offers many homemade knitting kits and patterns, as well as hand-dyed indigo yarn by owner Linda Perry.  (photo by Evan Houk)

Sheepscot Harbor Yarns at 74 Main Street in Damariscotta offers many homemade knitting kits and patterns, as well as hand-dyed indigo yarn by owner Linda Perry. (photo by Evan Houk)

“Look at the sky, look at the water, and it’s blue. Surrounded in blue, ”Perry said.

There are also several different designs and kits for hats, scarves, neck warmers, Scottish tam-o-shanters, and the Safe Harbor handbag, which has a shell tie.

Samples of these items, handcrafted by Perry, are also on sale in the store.

Perry has featured his models in Vogue Knitting and Interweave magazines.

“I try to do things that don’t look like they’re machine-made at all so people can understand it’s done by hand,” Perry said.

Perry tried selling his products online for a while after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, but said it wasn’t the same. She still runs an online store at harbouryarns.com.

“I’ve tried to have an online presence, but it’s not the same to buy yarn when you can’t touch it. It’s a different feeling online, ”Perry said.

Then, in June, she fulfilled her long-held dream of opening a storefront for her son and bosses. Perry said the store has been very busy since it first opened and has the best customers.

“It’s fun to interact with them, which you can’t do online, so it’s an added bonus for me to chat with them and see what they’re up to, and tell them a little bit about it. ‘history,’ Perry said.

The building that houses Sheepscot Harbor Yarns at 74 Main Street in Damariscotta.  Boutique opening hours are Wednesday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (photo by Evan Houk)

The building that houses Sheepscot Harbor Yarns at 74 Main Street in Damariscotta. Boutique opening hours are Wednesday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (photo by Evan Houk)

Perry has been knitting since she was little, when she watched her mother. However, since his mother was left-handed, Perry had to learn to knit. She still knits at least four hours a day.

“It’s fun for me; it’s not work, ”Perry said.

Perry was born in Maine, but raised in Mystic, Connecticut. After her father retired to Edgecomb, she began spending summer vacations away from her job as a teacher.

Perry received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Rhode Island and his doctorate in education from the University of Connecticut. She taught fashion, design and pattern making at the college level for 45 years, primarily at the University of Rhode Island.

After retiring three years ago, she returned to Lincoln County, which she calls a “special place.”

“It’s almost a world away from the world,” Perry said.

Sheepscot Harbor Yarns is open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, at least until December. Perry will play it by ear from there, depending on the business.

For more information, email [email protected] or call 449-5270.

About Tracy G. Larimore

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