full range – Bella Knitting http://BellaKnitting.com/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 04:31:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://BellaKnitting.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/cropped-icon-1-32x32.jpg full range – Bella Knitting http://BellaKnitting.com/ 32 32 SIU Craft Shop offers an array of arts and crafts opportunities this fall https://BellaKnitting.com/siu-craft-shop-offers-an-array-of-arts-and-crafts-opportunities-this-fall/ Wed, 18 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/siu-craft-shop-offers-an-array-of-arts-and-crafts-opportunities-this-fall/

CARBONDALE – Do you feel the need to be clever or creative? The Craft Store at Southern Illinois University Carbondale offers fall workshops that allow attendees to create pottery, tie-dye, glass, paint, wood, and more.

Located in the Student Center, the boutique hosts a full range of workshops. Additional cleaning and safety rules are in place, including limiting registrations to 10 people per class and masks are required.

The registration deadline is at least two days before the start of each workshop, but due to class size limitations, organizers encourage early registration at www.studentcenter.siu.edu/activities/craft -shop / workshops.

Currently, there are also plans to hold the traditional family weekend craft sale from September 24 to 25, the holiday craft sale from December 2 to 4, and the sale of Christmas crafts. Valentine’s Day Craft and Bazaar on February 14, 2022. Vendor requests are now being accepted for all three events. The public will be welcome to attend the sales.

Highlights of the fall workshops

The workshop program for this semester includes:

Carpentry workshop safety course – Session 1 is from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., August 28; Session 2 is 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. on September 11, free.

Tie-dye techniques – 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., August 31 $ 12 for students, $ 14 for others, materials included.

Pottery on the wheel – 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on September 2, 9, 16 and 23, $ 75 for students and $ 85 for others for the 4-week class, plus $ 12 for 10 pounds of clay.

Watercolor at lunchtime: small objects – 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., Sept. 1 $ 12 for students and $ 14 for others, all materials included.

Glass Bead Making – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., September 17, $ 25 for students, $ 30 for others, with glass purchased separately. A second session is scheduled for November 16 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Custom Greek Paddle – 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., September 18, $ 30 for students, $ 35 for others and includes materials.

Blockprint Tote Bag – 6 to 8:30 p.m. September 22, $ 25 for students, $ 30 for others, materials included.

Soy Wax Batik Tapestry – 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. September 28 and October 6, $ 65 for students and $ 70 for others, including all materials for the two-week workshop.

Introduction to sewing – 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on October 1 $ 20 for students and $ 25 for others, extra material.

Introduction to Quilting – 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. October 6, 13, 20 and 27, $ 100 for students and $ 120 for others, plus materials. The list of supplies will be provided prior to the four week workshop.

Knitting: scarf – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., October 7 and 14, $ 20 for students, $ 25 for others plus materials for the two weeks.

Coffee Cups – 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., October 9, $ 25 for students, $ 30 for others. The cost includes 2.5 pounds of clay and all slushies and glazes.

Introduction to Stained Glass – 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., October 19, 21, 26 and 28, $ 100 for students, $ 100 for others for the four sessions, as well as materials that can be purchased at the boutique.

Pottery on the wheel – 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., October 19, 26 and November 2, 9, $ 75 for students, $ 85 for others for the four sessions, plus $ 12 for 10 pounds of clay.

Lunchtime painting: fall foliage – noon-1 p.m., October 20, $ 12 for students, $ 14 for others, including all materials.

Metallurgical forge: cuff bracelet – 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., October 23, $ 30 for students, $ 35 for others, materials included.

Introduction to woodworking – 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., October 23, 30 and November 6, $ 65 for students and $ 70 for others for the three sessions, plus materials.

Polymer clay sculptures – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on October 22, $ 30 for students, $ 35 for others, materials included.

Handcrafted Pottery – 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., October 21, 28, and November 4, $ 55 for students and $ 60 for others for all four sessions, plus $ 12 for 10 pounds of clay.

Pen and ink at lunchtime – noon-1 p.m., Nov. 3, $ 12 for students, $ 14 for others, including materials.

Dyeing and Sewing: Pillowcase – 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., November 6 and 13, $ 45 for students, $ 50 for others for two weeks and includes materials.

Custom Printed Greeting Cards – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., November 10 and 24, $ 30 for students and $ 35 for others and includes all materials for both sessions.

Fused Glass Ornaments – 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. November 16, $ 25 for students and $ 30 for others; glass is purchased separately.

Silver Rings – 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 23, $ 35 for students and $ 40 for others, including materials.

All times and dates are subject to change.

To learn more

Age requirements vary for workshops. Find full details on all workshops and other activities, as well as registration information and details on upcoming craft sales, at studentcenter.siu.edu/activities/craft-shop/workshops. Or, email craftshop@siu.edu or call 618-453-3636 for more information.

Other options available

In addition, the Craft Shop offers the option of hosting birthday parties or other small group gatherings, private lessons, Zoom group craft parties, and virtual craft workshops.

The information is available online. Email craftshop@siu.edu or call (618) 453-3636 for more details.

]]> The SIU Craft Shop offers an array of arts and crafts opportunities this fall https://BellaKnitting.com/the-siu-craft-shop-offers-an-array-of-arts-and-crafts-opportunities-this-fall/ Mon, 16 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/the-siu-craft-shop-offers-an-array-of-arts-and-crafts-opportunities-this-fall/

August 16, 2021

The SIU Craft Shop offers an array of arts and crafts opportunities this fall

by Christi Mathis

CARBONDALE, Illinois — You can create pottery, tie-dye, glassware, paint, carpentry, and more during fall workshops at Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s craft store.

Located in the Student Center, the shop hosts a full range of workshops. Additional cleaning and safety rules are in place, including limiting registration to 10 people per class and masks are mandatory.

The registration deadline is at least two days before the start of each workshop, but due to class size limits, the organizers encourage early registration to

studentcenter.siu.edu/activities/craft-shop/workshops.

At present, plans also include holding the traditional Family Weekend Craft Sale on September 24-25, the Holiday Craft Sale on December 2-4, and the Craft Sale and Valentine’s Bazaar on February 14, 2022. Vendor applications are now being accepted for all three events. The public will be welcome to attend the sales.

Fall Workshop Highlights

The workshop program for this semester includes:

  • Safety course in carpentry workshops – Session 1 from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., August 28; Session 2 is from 1 to 2 p.m. September 11, free.
  • Tie-dye techniques – 5:30-7:30 p.m., August 31, $12 for students, $14 for others, materials included.
  • Wheel Pottery – 6-8:30 p.m. September 2, 9, 16, and 23, $75 for students and $85 for others for the 4-week course, plus $12 for 10 pounds of clay.
  • Noon Watercolor: Small Objects – 12 p.m.-1 p.m., Sept. 1, $12 for students and $14 for others, including all materials.
  • Glass Bead Making – 6-8 p.m., September 17, $25 for students, $30 for others, with glass purchased separately. A second session is scheduled from 6 to 8 p.m. on November 16.
  • Custom Greek Paddle – 12:30-3 p.m., September 18, $30 for students, $35 for others and includes materials.
  • Blockprint Tote Bag – 6-8:30 p.m. September 22, $25 for students, $30 for others, includes materials.
  • Soy Wax Batik Tapestry – 6 to 8:30 p.m. Sept. 28 and Oct. 6, $65 for students and $70 for others, including all materials for the two-week workshop.
  • Introduction to sewing – 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Oct. 1, $20 students and $25 for others, materials extra.
  • Introduction to Quilting – 5:30 to 8 p.m. Oct. 6, 13, 20 and 27, $100 for students and $120 for others, plus materials. The list of supplies will be provided prior to the four-week workshop.
  • Knitting: scarf – 6 to 8 p.m., Oct. 7 and 14, $20 for students, $25 for others plus materials for both weeks.
  • Slab Built Coffee Cups – 12:30-3 p.m., Oct. 9, $25 for students, $30 for others. Cost includes 2.5 pounds of clay and all slips and glazes.
  • Introduction to Stained Glass – 5 to 7 p.m., Oct. 19, 21, 26 and 28, $100 for students, $100 for others for all four sessions, plus materials available for purchase at the boutique.
  • Wheel Pottery – 6 to 8:30 p.m., October 19 and 26 and November 2 and 9, $75 for students, $85 for others for all four sessions, plus $12 for 10 pounds of clay.
  • Lunchtime Painting: Fall Foliage – 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., Oct. 20, $12 for students, $14 for others, includes all materials.
  • Metallurgy: cuff bracelet – 1 to 3:30 p.m., Oct. 23, $30 for students, $35 for others, including materials.
  • Introduction to woodworking – 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., Oct. 23, 30 and Nov. 6, $65 for students and $70 for others for the three sessions, plus materials.
  • Polymer Clay Sculptures – 6-8 p.m. Oct. 22, $30 for students, $35 for others, includes materials.
  • Craft Pottery – 6 to 8:30 p.m., October 21, 28 and November 4, $55 for students and $60 for others for all four sessions, plus $12 for 10 pounds of clay.
  • Pen and Ink Lunchtime – 12-1 p.m., Nov. 3, $12 for students, $14 for others, includes materials.
  • Dye and Sew: Pillowcase – 1 to 3 p.m., November 6 and 13, $45 for students, $50 for others for both weeks and includes materials.
  • Custom Printed Greeting Cards – 6 to 8 p.m., November 10 and 24, $30 for students and $35 for others and includes all materials for both sessions.
  • Fused Glass Ornaments – 6-8 p.m. Nov. 16, $25 for students and $30 for others; glass is purchased separately.
  • Silver Rings – 5:30-8 p.m. Nov. 23, $35 for students and $40 for others, including materials.

All times and dates are subject to change.

To learn more

Age requirements vary by workshop. Find full details on all workshops and other activities, as well as registration information and details on upcoming craft sales, at studentcenter.siu.edu/activities/craft-shop/workshops. Or email craftshop@siu.edu or call 618-453-3636 for more information.

Other options available

In addition, the craft shop offers:

  • Possibilities to organize birthday parties or other gatherings in small groups.
  • Private lessons.
  • Zoom group craft parties.
  • Virtual craft workshops.

The information is available online. Email craftshop@siu.edu or call 618-453-3636 for details.

]]>
Bringing Traditional Patterns into Modern Homes https://BellaKnitting.com/bringing-traditional-patterns-into-modern-homes/ Fri, 30 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/bringing-traditional-patterns-into-modern-homes/



Sometimes a direct message on Instagram can lead to a business partnership.

Last year, Marissa Freed, president of the former Winnipeg clothing company Freed & Freed International, heard from many people in the company about Indigo Arrows, a booming homewares brand that uses Minimalist traditional designs drawn from Anishinaabe pottery and bone tools. . Freed, the fourth generation to run the family business, was a huge fan.

“I was interested in hearing about them,” says Destiny Seymour, an interior decorator by trade who founded the growing company in 2016. “Even though they had been around for 100 years, I had never heard of them. , so I wanted to see what we could do.”

Destiny Seymour, founder of Indigo Arrows, can’t wait to scale with Freed & Freed.

“width=”2048″ height=”1673” srcset=”https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/400*400/NEP10529769.jpg 400w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/600*600 /NEP10529769.jpg 600w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/700*700/NEP10529769.jpg 700w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/800*800/NEP10529769.jpg 800w,https: //media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/900*900/NEP10529769.jpg 900w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/1000*1000/NEP10529769.jpg 1000w”/>

Ella Greyeyes photo

Destiny Seymour, founder of Indigo Arrows, is looking forward to scaling up with Freed & Freed.

Their first project was a collaboration on masks, which quickly became a key part of Freed & Freed’s production when the pandemic began. Using one of Seymour’s designs, the face coverings were made at the Freed factory, with all proceeds – over $35,000 – going to the Butterfly Club, an after-school club for Indigenous girls and youth. two-spirited.

But once this project started, the big question arose: what next?


Photo d'Alan Greyeyes</p>
<p>Indigo Arrows uses traditional minimalist designs drawn from Anishinaabe pottery and bone tools in their homeware designs.</p>
<p>“width=”1512″ height=”2048” srcset=”https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/400*400/NEP10529766.jpg 400w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/600*600 /NEP10529766.jpg 600w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/700*700/NEP10529766.jpg 700w”/>				</a>																
<figcaption>
<p>Photo by Alan Greyeyes</p>
<p>Indigo Arrows uses traditional minimalist designs drawn from Anishinaabe pottery and bone tools in their homeware designs.</p>
</figcaption></figure>
<p>This week, Indigo Arrows X Freed launched the first batch of products from a 50-50 partnership, a collection of cushions using the former company’s vegan leathers and furs and production capacity, as well as old but moderns of the new society.  The partnership’s products sold on Canadian fashion site Simons as well as its own e-commerce portal, and in the fall, a <a class=full range
of homewares – including table linens, towels, bedding and more again – will be launched.

For Freed, the partnership represents the latest step in diversifying the company’s production, which has traditionally been in the outerwear and apparel industries since brothers David and Morris Freed began manufacturing trousers in knees for Eaton in 1920.

The world of clothing is still the company’s main focus, but in recent years it has taken a modern approach, with the launch of an in-house brand in 2014 in vegan and cruelty-free outerwear, PPE in response to the pandemic – the company is making more than 30 face masks, as well as medical gowns – and soon, home decor.


Photo d'Alan Greyeyes</p>
<p>Seymour’s designs inspired her first collaboration with Freed & Freed — face masks.</p>
<p>“width=”2048″ height=”1365” srcset=”https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/400*400/NEP10529767.jpg 400w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/600*600 /NEP10529767.jpg 600w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/700*700/NEP10529767.jpg 700w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/800*800/NEP10529767.jpg 800w,https: //media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/900*900/NEP10529767.jpg 900w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/1000*1000/NEP10529767.jpg 1000w”/>				</a>																
<figcaption>
<p>Photo by Alan Greyeyes</p>
<p>Seymour’s designs inspired her first collaboration with Freed & Freed — face masks.</p>
</figcaption></figure>
<p>“Faux fur naturally progressed and we thought it could do more than just clothing,” Freed says.  Going forward, she says, she hopes non-apparel products will continue to take a bigger slice of the pie, with not just direct-to-consumer purchases, but also hotel partnerships and more.			</p>
<p>“The sky’s the limit for (this partnership),” Freed says.			</p>
<figure class=

Photo d'Alan Greyeyes</p>
<p>The Indigo Arrow X Freed cushion collection uses vegan leathers and furs from Freed & Freed, and designs from Indigo Arrows.</p>
<p>“width=”1512″ height=”2048” srcset=”https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/400*400/NEP10529768.jpg 400w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/600*600 /NEP10529768.jpg 600w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/700*700/NEP10529768.jpg 700w”/>				</a>																
<br />
				
<figcaption>
<p>Photo by Alan Greyeyes</p>
<p>The Indigo Arrow X Freed cushion collection uses vegan leathers and furs from Freed & Freed, and designs from Indigo Arrows.</p>
</figcaption></figure>
<p>For Seymour, the joint venture is a boon to his already expanding business, which typically sells out its product lines quickly, due to small-batch production.  “It’s a big relief as a manufacturer,” says Seymour, who hired local sewers and worked with local companies Garmitech and Anne Mulaire Boutique on his other products.			</p>
<p>The designer runs most of the business from home, with her husband and 11-year-old daughter to keep up with growing demand.  The new partnership will allow the company to “step into another type of production” at the scale needed to manufacture the partnership’s next line of products.			</p>
<p>Seymour, a master’s in interior design and a member of Peguis First Nation, started her business in 2016. She was inspired by the designs of pottery pieces stored at the Manitoba Museum, some of which have more than 3,000 years old and have been found in Peguis or Manigotagan.  Her father helped her name the models and also held ceremonies to thank them.			</p>
<div class=

One of the main goals was to bring these specific, local Manitoba designs back into public view, along with product names and colorways in Anishinaabemowin. “Now people send me pictures of the designs in their living rooms and bedrooms,” Seymour says. “Some people don’t want to use the tea towels so they frame them.”


Photo d'Alan Greyeyes</p>
<p>Destiny Seymour, Founder of Indigo Arrows</p>
<p>“width=”2048″ height=”1365” srcset=”https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/400*400/NEP10529770.jpg 400w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/600*600 /NEP10529770.jpg 600w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/700*700/NEP10529770.jpg 700w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/800*800/NEP10529770.jpg 800w,https: //media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/900*900/NEP10529770.jpg 900w,https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/1000*1000/NEP10529770.jpg 1000w”/>				</a>																
<figcaption>
<p>Photo by Alan Greyeyes</p>
<p>Destiny Seymour, Founder of Indigo Arrows</p>
</figcaption></figure>
<p>Representation, which some may consider a buzzword, is hugely important, says Seymour, whose work has been featured in major publications and attracted large audiences online.  “It goes a long way when you see your culture in a house, or even in a magazine,” she says.			</p>
<p>Working with Freed & Freed, Seymour says two new model sets are in the works, and she and Freed are counting the days until the fall release.			</p>
<p>“When we originally contacted Destiny, we never planned to release an indoor apparel line,” Freed says.  “But there’s more to come from us, I think. There’s a lot more we want to do together.”			</p>
<p>ben.waldman@freepress.mb.ca			</p>
<p style=
If you enjoy coverage of the Manitoba arts scene, help us do more.
Your contribution of $10, $25 or more will enable Free Press to further our theater, dance, music and gallery reporting while ensuring that the widest possible audience can access our arts journalism.

BECOME A SUPPORTER OF ARTISTIC JOURNALISM
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Ben Waldman

]]> Faurecia creates the Sustainable Materials division https://BellaKnitting.com/faurecia-creates-the-sustainable-materials-division/ Tue, 27 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/faurecia-creates-the-sustainable-materials-division/

Fibers / Threads / Fabrics

Faurecia, one of the world leaders in automotive technology headquartered in Nantes, France, is creating a new division dedicated to the development and manufacture of sustainable and intelligent materials.

The new Sustainable Materials division will benefit from Faurecia’s leadership positions in the automotive interiors and seats market and from its unique portfolios of materials with ultra-low and negative CO2 emissions, as well as those integrating thermal, acoustic and biomedical technologies.

Leveraging its global footprint, the Sustainable Materials division will work with several business groups and offer a full range of low CO2 and even negative CO2 materials to OEMs to support their sustainability goals.

Faurecia will capitalize on its experiences in formulating bio-sourced materials and its processing expertise, including the management of low variability.

The company plans to build an R&D center dedicated to sustainable materials and a pilot plant, both of which will become operational in 2022. The new division will initially employ 125 engineers and more than 400 by 2030.

“With decades of experience in the development of bio-sourced materials, Faurecia intends to increase its contribution to the fight against climate change by investing significantly in the development of materials with a very low CO2 footprint,” said Patrick Koller, CEO. “This new division, associated with a first-rate industrial and academic ecosystem, will help us achieve our turnover targets of € 3 billion by 2030 in this area, foster sustainable growth and support efforts to meet our CO2 reduction commitments by 2030. ”

www.faurecia.com

]]> Baisley Patterns | www.splicetoday.com https://BellaKnitting.com/baisley-patterns-www-splicetoday-com/ Wed, 16 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/baisley-patterns-www-splicetoday-com/

I have rarely visited South East Queens. I was there a lot more when I lived in Bay Ridge as I could cycle almost straight east and end up there. I would run myself to see how fast I could do a round trip from Bay Ridge to, say, Laurelton or Rosedale, and sometimes Valley Stream. Since Brooklyn shares Long Island with Queens, it was much easier for me to get to Queens from Brooklyn. I rarely cycled to Manhattan, as it involved the Brooklyn Bridge. Roebling’s masterpiece is currently hardly shared between idle tourists and bicycle racers, but in the 1970s and 1980s it was central, and as simplicity and freedom from danger have always been my credo , I can count on two hands, to this day, the number of times I have cycled the Brooklyn Bridge.

Visitors unfamiliar with South East Queens will find a vast oasis of greenery at Baisley Pond Park, which sits on uneven terrain between Foch, Sutphin, Rockaway and Baisley Boulevard. The park’s 110 acres offer baseball, softball and cricket fields in its southern extension between Rockaway Blvd. and the Belt Parkway, children’s play areas, catch-and-release fishing in its large peaceful pond and numerous benches.

On one of the playgrounds is what appears to be an elephant carved up to the shoulders in a pit of tar. This is a reference to a prehistoric era find that city engineers made here in the early 1850s, when they barred three streams to build a reservoir that would help supply the city with water. from Brooklyn.

Baisley Pond, 1909. I have added modern street names. A number of place names in South Queens refer to water pipes: North and South Conduit Aves., Aqueduct Raceway, etc. The names refer to an old aqueduct that the city of Brooklyn built in what is now Highland Park called Ridgewood Reservoir, which was decommissioned in the 1960s as a water source, but was once the main water source for the city. The aqueduct ran between the now demolished waterworks in Freeport and the Ridgewood Reservoir.

Today’s Baisley Pond, named after a mid-19th century farming family on whose land the pond was created, first appeared in the 1850s. When engineers Brooklyn civilians dredged the pond to make it deeper after it was created, remains were found of an American juggernaut including five molars and a bone fragment, which were sent decades later to the American Museum of natural History. Huge, shaggy elephant-like creatures frequented South Queens until 10,000 years ago. The reasons for their disappearance are still debated, but probably have something to do with climate change and the appearance in the region of the world’s most feared hunter, Man.

In 1909, when the map was produced, real estate developments such as Jamaica Park began to appear. As the global grid of streets has coalesced, developments have become less exclusive and have been integrated into the entire neighborhood. This real estate development intensified after the end of the two world wars.

Bullfrogs frequent the pond, along with snapping and red-eared turtles, dragonflies, and a full range of shorebirds, including web-footed friends like geese, ducks and swans as well as blackbirds, cormorants, herons, egrets, doves, mockingbirds, robins, starlings, warblers, cardinals and the usual pigeons and sparrows.

The South Queens neighborhood of St. Albans was mostly farmland until the 1890s, when a small community began to take shape around Farmers and Linden Boulevard. The city was named by its first 100 inhabitants in honor of Britain’s first Christian martyr. The area was home to the St. Albans golf course from 1915 to the Depression; sports luminaries such as Babe Ruth perfected their shots there. The former golf course is now the extended care center for the St. Albans Veterans Administration and Roy Wilkins Park.

Roy Wilkins Park sits on a property that was once occupied by the St. Albans Naval Hospital. After the hospital closed in 1974, the US government awarded the 100-acre site to the Veterans Administration, which built a veterans extended care center on the eastern end of the property and ceded the western half. to New York City in 1977 for use as a park. It remained largely underdeveloped until 1982, when $ 3.3 million was allocated for its redevelopment. One of the hospital buildings was renovated and reopened as the Roy Wilkins Family Center in 1986, which includes an Olympic-sized swimming pool equipped to accommodate the disabled, sanitary blocks, a playground, tables picnic area, tennis, basketball and handball courts, baseball fields and a jogging track. The facility also hosts a summer day camp for 300 children, after-school programs, a counseling center, and a variety of community events.

Roy Wilkins (1901-1981) was a journalist and civil rights activist born in Missouri and raised in Minnesota. After a passage with the Kansas City Call, he joined the NAACP in 1931 and served as the organization’s president from 1955 to 1977, promoting voter registration, fair housing laws and pay equity.

The Black Spectrum Theater in Roy Wilkins Park was founded in 1970 by playwright, director and filmmaker Carl Clay. Black Spectrum produces cinematographic, theatrical and video works examining issues of concern to African-American and Caribbean-American audiences. The 425-seat theater was built in a former officers’ club. The theater holds an annual gala; previous winners have been the late husband and wife actors Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee and filmmaker Melvin Van Peebles.

In addition, Roy Wilkins Park features a huge vegetable garden tended by locals and an African-American Hall of Fame honoring individuals such as the United Nations Under Secretary of the United Nations and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Ralph Bunche, and the first black woman elected to the House of Representatives, Shirley Chisholm.

In southern Jamaica and St. Albans, Foch Boulevard replaces 117th Avenue from Rockaway Boulevard. at Merrick Blvd., with a small chunk for two blocks between Montauk St. and Everett Pl. The only notable Foch I know of is Ferdinand Foch (1851-1929), the commander of the Allied forces in the later stages of WWI . Foch Blvd. appears on maps as early as the 1920s (it was formerly the name of Linden Blvd. from Farmers Blvd. on the Nassau County line); he may be named after the general, but his connection to Queens is unclear at best.

The mural on the north side of Linden Boulevard. at St. Albans Station Long Island RR is one of Queens’ treasures and represents the great local sportsmen, jazz and pop who have made their home in St. Albans and nearby Addisleigh Park, including boxer Tommy “Hurricane” Jackson, Brooklyn Dodgers Roy Campanella and Jackie Robinson, jazz greats Count Basie, Billie Holiday, Illinois Jacquet, Ella Fitzgerald, Lena Horne, Milt Hinton, John Coltrane and Fats Waller, as well as R & B / soul giants Brook Benton and James Brown.

Southern Queens’ rise as a mecca for jazz musicians began in 1923 when Clarence Williams, a successful musician and entrepreneur from Plaquemine, Louisiana, purchased a house and eight lots at 171-37 108th Ave .. Anticipating With the growing popularity of jazz in the north, Williams moved first to Chicago in 1920, then to New York with his wife, singer Eva Taylor, in 1923. Desiring open spaces reminiscent of his upbringing in the Louisiana Delta, Williams takes up residence in Queens. He would be the first in a long line of jazz musicians to come to South Queens. The area, named Addisleigh Park, was officially developed from 1926 with several blocks of Tudor-style houses.

When I first met Linden Blvd. in St. Albans on bike rides from Brooklyn, and I first saw it on maps in the 1960s, I was slightly amazed. The west end of the street is at Flatbush Ave., and it was originally called Linden Ave. for a few blocks and so named for the many lime trees in Flatbush when the avenue was laid out. Over time, Linden Blvd. gradually spread further and further east. In the early 1920s, Kings Highway was revived as a multi-lane juggernaut and a highway in eastern New York called Vienna Ave. received the same treatment and was renamed East End of Linden Blvd. at a time. Linden Blvd. is transferred to Conduit Blvd. then into the Belt Parkway several miles east of Kings Highway. Then various routes in East Queens such as Central Aves. were renamed Linden Blvd. in advance of a great plan to connect all Linden Blvd. in Queens and Brooklyn that never materialized because depression and war kicked in.

—Kevin Walsh is the webmaster of the award-winning Forgotten NY website and author of the books Forgotten New York (HarperCollins, 2006) and also, with the Greater Astoria Historical Society, Forgotten queens (Arcadia, 2013)

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Affordable Women’s Clothing Store Patterns & Dots to Open at Empire Outlets https://BellaKnitting.com/affordable-womens-clothing-store-patterns-dots-to-open-at-empire-outlets/ Wed, 21 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/affordable-womens-clothing-store-patterns-dots-to-open-at-empire-outlets/

STATEN ISLAND, NY – A new clothing store specializing in affordable women’s clothing is making its way to Empire Outlets in St. George.

The 350,000 square foot shopping complex, located next to the St. George Ferry Terminal, has announced that Patterns & Dots is rolling out multiple locations across town and has chosen Empire Outlets for its Staten Island debut.

“We are thrilled to welcome Patterns & Dots to Empire Outlets and are proud to welcome this inclusive fashion company to our community,” said Joseph Ferrara, Director of BFC Partners. “We know that investing in local businesses is a critical part of the COVID recovery, and we are excited to continue to offer a variety of retailers on our premises. “

While an official opening date has yet to be announced, Patterns & Dots plans to offer a 525 America Free Matte Lipstick Trio Gift Set with all purchases as a full-time opening promotion. limited.

Patterns & Dots is coming to Empire Outlets on Staten Island. (Photo provided by Empire Outlets / Patterns & Dots)

According to its website, the store’s inventory is described as a collection of more than 25 brands from casual to professional styles, sweaters, knits and fabrics in a full range of sizes. Patterns & Dots consistently offers 50% off all new arrivals and 75% off regular inventory. The store uses a unique “tag sale” approach with colored dots on each ticket, which corresponds to a different discount each week.

“We are entering an exciting period of expansion and are delighted to open our very first store in Staten Island at Empire Outlets,” said Carmen Wamre, senior vice president of stores for Patterns & Dots. “We’re expanding our reach for our inclusive and accessible apparel, and this location brings us even closer to providing affordable fashion to all New Yorkers. “

It should be open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday.

For more information, visit PatternsandDots.com.

Can’t wait for the Staten Island site to open? Those wishing to shop at Patterns & Dots can visit their store at 157 E. 86th St. in Manhattan.

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Best Books on Knitting Patterns – ARTnews.com https://BellaKnitting.com/best-books-on-knitting-patterns-artnews-com/ Mon, 02 Nov 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/best-books-on-knitting-patterns-artnews-com/

Do you like to knit? Are you always looking for new projects and interesting options? A good source is the Knitting Pattern Books, which contain a wealth of challenging projects featuring a full range of stitches and skill levels. Most include an introduction to basic knitting skills and materials, with clear and concise instructions teaching a variety of construction stitches and steps. Some also include tips for designing your own knitted pieces. These books are great references even when you are working on other projects like beautiful handmade gifts. Knit chic clothes and fun toys by following these wonderful knitting patterns.

1. Seamless knit sweaters in 2 weeks: 20 designs for crisp cardigans, sweaters, t-shirts and more

Knit the perfect sweater quickly with one of these many stunning sweater designs. Each sweater is a snap to make. Sweater patterns include material charts, stitch abbreviations, step-by-step instructions for determining the perfect size for your sweater, clear written instructions, beautiful photographs of key steps and illustrations. Also included are basic instructions for beginners, tips for selecting the perfect yarn, and guidelines for determining the size of the sweater by taking precise measurements. Perfect for those who are intimidated by knitting clothes, these sweaters not only fit, but they’re comfy and look great.

To buy:
Seamless sweaters in 2 weeks: 20 models…

$ 21.99

2. Knitted animal friends

Create 12 adorable stuffed animals, from cats and horses to hedgehogs, using easy-to-follow instructions and templates. Animals have the same basic pattern for their body, arms, and legs, with slight variations in color and detail for each animal. Heads and tails vary, and building directions are a snap for the different end animals. Clothing and accessories are interchangeable for endless wardrobe possibilities. Photos of each step are included with clear and concise written instructions. Animals are easy for intermediate knitters; beginners will learn skills for making human-sized clothes by knitting tiny clothes for these creatures. The finished dolls are 16 inches tall, perfect for carrying, cuddling, and endless hours of play.

To buy:
Knitted animal friends

$ 20.49

3.400 knitting stitches: a complete dictionary of essential stitch patterns

This excellent book has a full line of patterns for beginner to intermediate to advanced knitters. The designs are organized into eight types of stitches, including purl, cables, lace, doubles, cables and flaps. In each section, the points and skills build on each other. Each point is clearly drawn with written instructions and color photos. Select one point per session, then go to the next; students will quickly master strong knitting skills from this book. Educators can work one-on-one with students to determine their skill level and interests, identifying the point and project that is right for them. Find the perfect knitting pattern for each of your students in the pages of this encyclopedic book.

To buy:
400 knitting stitches: a complete dictionary of …

$ 16.59

4. Knit shawls and scarves in 1 week: 30 quick patterns to keep you warm in style

Want to make a beautiful handmade gift in a jiffy? Maybe you just want a project that won’t take long to complete. This book features beautiful hoods, shawls, capes and wraps for every season that only require minimal time. Beautiful photographs, thread recommendations, material and stitch tables, and illustrations accompany the detailed written models. The patterns are easy to remember for faster knitting, but there is enough variation that you won’t get bored. A pleasure to knit, these patterns offer captivating projects for a range of skill levels: from advanced beginners to seasoned pros. Take your time knitting the pieces or, as an added bonus, complete one of these gorgeous garments in a week.

To buy:
Knit shawls and scarves in 1 week: 30 quick patterns …

$ 15.99

5. Japanese knitting stitch bible: 260 exquisite patterns by Hitomi Shida

This book is every avid knitter’s dream: hundreds of imaginative patterns from famous Japanese designer Hitomi Shida. Each model has detailed graphics with symbols representing each point. Reference photos and key illustrations for intricate and unusual stitch combinations ensure you’re on the right track every step of the way. Ideal for knitters who like to work from charts, the patterns in this book don’t include row-by-row written instructions. The introductory sections cover the basics, including how to identify symbols and select wires. The patterns include a range of intricate stitches: twists, borders, twists, popcorn and cross stitches. Experienced knitters looking to learn new and unusual stitches will find their next knitting adventure in this book.

To buy:
Japanese knitting stitch bible: 260 exquisite …

$ 16.34

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