environmental impact – Bella Knitting http://BellaKnitting.com/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 04:30:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://BellaKnitting.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/cropped-icon-1-32x32.jpg environmental impact – Bella Knitting http://BellaKnitting.com/ 32 32 Independent designers get creative with yarns and dyes https://BellaKnitting.com/independent-designers-get-creative-with-yarns-and-dyes/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 20:03:37 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/independent-designers-get-creative-with-yarns-and-dyes/

When you see a cute handmade sweater, you know it took a long time to make.

Knitting or crocheting is only part of it. (A fun online calculator at www.lovecrafts.com estimates how long it would take from a basic scarf to a blanket, baby booties or patterned garment; figure between 20 and 80 hours.)

Before that, however, there are those who make the threads. Independent artisans are making new things with wool and other fibers, including recycled plastic, as well as dyes.

Samantha Myrhe, owner of RavensWood Fiber Co. in Nova Scotia, Canada, started a dozen years ago with a few sheep, and her third generation of lambs were sheared this fall. She sells her yarns online and at local markets, and gives her quirky dyes quirky names, like Sea Glass, a dreamy water-hued blend; Fireflies, in the starry colors of the night sky; and Autumn Drive, evoking a ride through an autumn forest.

“Dyeing is chemistry,” she says. “Although the process we use is a simple heat and acid-vinegar process to fix colors, the underlying chemistry involves the bonding of a color molecule to a wool molecule. More or less molecules , color more or less intense.

She found that using water from the local municipal system created unpredictable colors, so she turned to well water instead. Yet there is an element of luck: more rain means more minerals in the water. “More minerals mean my reds can be more orange, my blacks break up and go gold. It’s crazy,” she says.

Myrrh has a good group of reliable and “stable” colors, but also what the indie dye world calls OOAK: One of a Kinds.

“The magic of what the dye gods gave me that day,” she says.

Different fibers take dye in different ways. Alpaca hues tend towards pastels because they don’t absorb as much color. Nylon and silk absorb dye and, when mixed with merino wool, provide a beautiful depth of color.

Some dyers are exploring other types of wool, including yak, cashmere and Australian Polwarth sheep, which has a strong, silky character good for many woven projects.

The wool gets high marks for durability; as the International Wool Textile Organization notes, it is renewable, biodegradable and recyclable. Around the world, many farms, studios and workshops produce yarn and other textile products using techniques with low environmental impact, including recycling water and using little or no additives.

Britt-Marie Alm, who runs Love Fest Fibers in San Francisco, offers small-batch yarns from sustainably operated mills on the West Coast, Nepal and Tibet. Alm has had a decades-long love of Tibetan culture ever since he joined a community service project at a local high school. She learned spinning and weaving techniques from Tibetan artisans and now supports several women-led collectives there and in the United States.

Her soft, chunky yarns include Color Core, in which she weaves ethically sourced merino wool around colorful organic cotton fiber; the result looks like a woolly Twizzler. Alm came up with the idea during the pandemic.

“I was spending more time indoors, as we all were, and became captivated by the amazing weaves made by customers exploring inside our yarn,” she says. “Their techniques centered around cutting the threads to show the inner cross section, and it was mesmerizing – the textures and color gradients were just stunning.”

Along with her partners at the Washington State factory — a mother-daughter team that also breeds a few alpacas — she developed seven Color Core colorways.

Love Fest also offers a naturally fluffy yak yarn called kullu, which looks like cashmere, without the sheep shearing.

“The last few years have seen a reinvention of what yarn can do,” Alm says. She cites a range of knitted and crocheted homewares, from baskets and rugs to pillows and poufs. The chunky yarn and huge stitches that make these projects possible, she says, are more than just visually striking.

“It’s also very gratifying to be able to complete a project so quickly. It has captured the imagination of a new generation of fiber artists who learn to knit a big basket and then go on to explore macrame and weaving,” she says.

Sustainable options for yarn now also include recycled linen and plastic fiber.

“I grew up crocheting and knitting so many polyester and acrylic yarns; it seemed such a shame that more recycled materials were not being used,” says Alm.

She worked with her mill to create ReLove, a fiber that blends plastic water bottles with merino to create a soft, chunky yarn available in colors like denim, curry, fog and leche. The sets contain 40 meters of yarn, which saves about 10 plastic bottles from landfills, she says.

Other notable independent operations include farm/mill combos like Red Hill Fiber Mill in Taswell, Indiana, which raises alpacas, runs educational tours, and spins and sells yarn and wool products gleaned from their herd. Lydia Christiansen’s Abundant Earth Fiber, on Whidbey Island north of Seattle, features wool spun from East Frisian sheep that graze just down the road from her mill.

Myrhe and Alm say that independently made dyes and yarns tell stories that make a knitted piece more valuable to the wearer.

Myrhe loves the journey that the dyes take her on. Often her best finds, she says, are “happy accidents,” and she tries to jot everything down quickly. “I lost a lot of treasures thinking I would remember and save later. I couldn’t remember, and the most beautiful coppery red eluded me for years, only to be found by chance a few months later.

]]>
Independent designers get creative with yarns and dyes – News-Herald https://BellaKnitting.com/independent-designers-get-creative-with-yarns-and-dyes-news-herald/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 13:38:02 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/independent-designers-get-creative-with-yarns-and-dyes-news-herald/

By KIM COOK

When you see a cute, handmade sweater, you know it took a while to make.

Knitting or crochet is one of them. (A fun online calculator at www.lovecrafts.com estimates how long it would take you for everything from a basic scarf to a blanket, baby booties, or patterned clothing; count 20 to 80 hours.)

Before that, however, there are those who make the threads. Independent artisans are making new things with wool and other fibers, including recycled plastic, as well as with dyes.

Samantha Myrhe, owner of RavensWood Fiber Co. in Nova Scotia, Canada, started a dozen years ago with a few sheep, and her third generation of lambs were shorn this fall. She sells her yarns online and in local markets, and gives her original dyes original names, like Sea Glass, a mixture of dreamlike water hues; Fireflies, in the starry colors of the night sky; and Autumn Drive, evoking a walk through an autumn forest.

“Dye is a chemistry,” she says. “Although the process we use is a simple, heat and acid vinegar process to define colors, the underlying chemistry involves the binding of a color molecule to a wool molecule. More or less molecules, more or less intense color.

She found that using water from the local municipal system created unpredictable colors, so she turned to well water instead. Still, there is an element of luck: more rain means more minerals in the water. “More minerals means my reds can be more orange, my blacks break and turn gold. It’s crazy, ”she said.

Myrhe offers a good group of reliable and “stable” colors, but also what the independent dye world calls OOAK: One of a Kinds.

“The magic of what the dye gods gave me that day,” she said.

Different fibers take up the dye in different ways. Alpaca shades tend towards pastel, as they don’t absorb as much color. Nylon and silk absorb the dye and, when mixed with merino wool, provide a beautiful depth of color.

Some dyers are exploring other types of wool including yak, cashmere, and Australian Polwarth sheep, which have a strong, silky character ideal for many weaving projects.

Wool gets high marks for durability; as the International Wool Textile Organization notes, it is renewable, biodegradable and recyclable. Around the world, many farms, studios and workshops produce yarns and other textile products using techniques with low environmental impact, including water recycling and the use of little or no additives.

Britt-Marie Alm, who runs Love Fest Fibers in San Francisco, offers yarns in small batches from sustainably operated workshops on the West Coast, Nepal and Tibet. Alm has a long-standing love of Tibetan culture since joining a community service project at a high school in the area. She learned spinning and weaving techniques from Tibetan artisans and now supports several women-led collectives there and in the United States.

Her soft, thick yarns include Color Core, in which she weaves ethically sourced merino wool around a colorful organic cotton fiber; the result looks like a woolly Twizzler. Alm came up with the idea during the pandemic.

“I spent more time inside, like all of us, and was captivated by the incredible weaves made by clients exploring the inside of our yarn,” she says. “Their techniques centered around cutting the threads to show the interior cross section, and it was fascinating – the textures and color gradients were just stunning.”

Along with her factory partners in Washington state – a mother-daughter team that also raises a few alpacas – she developed seven Color Core colourways.

Love Fest also has a naturally shed fluffy yak yarn called kullu, which looks like cashmere without the sheep shearing.

“In recent years, we’ve been rethinking what yarn can make,” says Alm. She cites a range of knitted and crocheted household items, from baskets and rugs to pillows and ottomans. The thick thread and huge stitches that make these projects possible, she says, are more than visually striking.

“It’s also very rewarding to be able to do a project so quickly. It has captured the imaginations of a new generation of fiber artists who are learning the skills to knit a big basket and then continue to explore macrame and weaving, ”she says.

Sustainable options for yarn now also include recycled flax and plastic fiber.

“I grew up crocheting and knitting so many polyester and acrylic yarns; it seemed such a shame that more recycled material was not used, ”says Alm.

She worked with her factory to create ReLove, a fiber that mixes plastic water bottles with merino to create a soft, thick yarn available in colors like denim, curry, fog and leche. The sets contain 40 meters of wire, which saves around 10 plastic bottles from landfills, she says.

Other notable independent operations include farm / factory combinations like Red Hill Fiber Mill in Taswell, Indiana, which raises alpacas, conducts educational tours, and spins and sells yarn and wool products gleaned from their herd. Lydia Christiansen’s bountiful earth fiber, on Whidbey Island north of Seattle, includes wool spun from East Frisian sheep that graze just down the road from her mill.

Yarn enthusiast Michelle Thymmons has compiled a list of popular Instagram thread dyers in North America and Europe on her website www.vamicreations.com. They include a multigenerational family at Bumblebee Farm in Davis, Illinois that raises sheep and rabbits, dyes and makes their own knitting fibers, and runs Harry Potter, “The Lord of the Rings” and themed yarn clubs. “Game Of Thrones . “

Knitwear and pattern designer Norman Schwarze in Munich, Germany has a worldwide compilation at www.nimble-needles.com which includes Vivid Wool outside of Reykjavik, Iceland; Wishbone sons in South Africa and The Blue Brick in Ontario, Canada.

The Yarnspirations company has developed a new format for the ball of yarn itself – a lifeline-shaped ring called an O’Go which it says is less prone to tangles. O’Go is available under different brands and in a range of colors.

Myrh and Alm say independently produced dyes and yarns tell stories that make a knitted piece more valuable to its wearer.

Myrh loves the trip the dyes take her. Often her best finds, she says, are “happy accidents,” and she tries to jot everything down quickly. “I lost many treasures thinking I would remember and record them later. I didn’t remember, and the most beautiful coppery red escaped me for years, only to be found by chance a few months later.

]]>
Handicrafts: independent designers get creative with yarns, dyes https://BellaKnitting.com/handicrafts-independent-designers-get-creative-with-yarns-dyes/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 13:07:00 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/handicrafts-independent-designers-get-creative-with-yarns-dyes/

When you see a cute, handmade sweater, you know it took a while to make.

Knitting or crochet is one of them. (A fun online calculator at www.lovecrafts.com estimates how long it would take you for everything from a basic scarf to a blanket, baby booties, or patterned clothing; count 20 to 80 hours.)

Before that, however, there are those who make the threads. Independent artisans are making new things with wool and other fibers, including recycled plastic, as well as with dyes.

Samantha Myrhe, owner of RavensWood Fiber Co. in Nova Scotia, Canada, started a dozen years ago with a few sheep, and her third generation of lambs were shorn this fall. She sells her yarns online and in local markets, and gives her original dyes original names, like Sea Glass, a mixture of dreamlike water hues; Fireflies, in the starry colors of the night sky; and Autumn Drive, evoking a walk through an autumn forest.

“Dye is a chemistry,” she says. “Although the process we use is a simple, heat and acid vinegar process to define colors, the underlying chemistry involves the binding of a color molecule to a wool molecule. More or less molecules, more or less intense color.

She found that using water from the local municipal system created unpredictable colors, so she turned to well water instead. Still, there is an element of luck: more rain means more minerals in the water. “More minerals means my reds can be more orange, my blacks break and turn gold. It’s crazy, ”she said.

Myrh has a good group of reliable and “stable” colors, but also what the independent dye world calls OOAK: One of a Kinds.

“The magic of what the dye gods gave me that day,” she said.

Different fibers take up the dye in different ways. Alpaca shades tend towards pastel, as they don’t absorb as much color. Nylon and silk absorb the dye and, when mixed with merino wool, provide a beautiful depth of color.

Some dyers are exploring other types of wool including yak, cashmere, and Australian Polwarth sheep, which have a strong, silky character ideal for many weaving projects.

Wool gets high marks for durability; as the International Wool Textile Organization notes, it is renewable, biodegradable and recyclable. Around the world, many farms, studios and workshops produce yarns and other textile products using techniques with low environmental impact, including water recycling and the use of little or no additives.

Britt-Marie Alm, who runs Love Fest Fibers in San Francisco, offers yarns in small batches from sustainably operated workshops on the West Coast, Nepal and Tibet. Alm has a long-standing love of Tibetan culture since joining a community service project at a high school in the area. She learned spinning and weaving techniques from Tibetan artisans and now supports several women-led collectives there and in the United States.

Her soft, thick yarns include Color Core, in which she weaves ethically sourced merino wool around a colorful organic cotton fiber; the result looks like a woolly Twizzler. Alm came up with the idea during the pandemic.

“I spent more time indoors, like all of us, and was captivated by the incredible weaves made by clients exploring the inside of our yarn,” she says. “Their techniques centered around cutting the threads to show the interior cross section, and it was fascinating – the textures and color gradients were just stunning.”

Along with her factory partners in Washington state – a mother-daughter team that also raises a few alpacas – she developed seven Color Core colourways.

Love Fest also has a naturally shed fluffy yak yarn called kullu, which looks like cashmere without the sheep shearing.

“In recent years, we’ve been rethinking what yarn can make,” says Alm. She cites a range of knitted and crocheted household items, from baskets and rugs to pillows and ottomans. The thick thread and huge stitches that make these projects possible, she says, are more than visually striking.

“It’s also very rewarding to be able to do a project so quickly. It has captured the imaginations of a new generation of fiber artists who are learning the skills to knit a large basket and then continue to explore macrame and weaving, ”she says.

Sustainable options for yarn now also include recycled flax and plastic fiber.

“I grew up crocheting and knitting so many polyester and acrylic yarns; it seemed such a shame that more recycled material was not used, ”says Alm.

She worked with her factory to create ReLove, a fiber that mixes plastic water bottles with merino to create a soft, thick yarn available in colors like denim, curry, fog and leche. The sets contain 40 meters of wire, which saves around 10 plastic bottles from landfills, she says.

Other notable independent operations include farm / factory combinations like Red Hill Fiber Mill in Taswell, Indiana, which raises alpacas, conducts educational tours, and spins and sells yarn and wool products gleaned from their herd. Lydia Christiansen’s bountiful earth fiber, on Whidbey Island north of Seattle, includes wool spun from East Frisian sheep that graze just down the road from her mill.

Yarn enthusiast Michelle Thymmons has compiled a list of popular Instagram thread dyers in North America and Europe on her website www.vamicreations.com. They include a multigenerational family at Bumblebee Farm in Davis, Illinois that raises sheep and rabbits, dyes and makes their own knitting fibers, and runs Harry Potter, “The Lord of the Rings” and themed yarn clubs. “Game Of Thrones . “

Knitwear and pattern designer Norman Schwarze in Munich, Germany has a worldwide compilation at www.nimble-needles.com that includes Vivid Wool outside of Reykjavik, Iceland; Wishbone sons in South Africa and The Blue Brick in Ontario, Canada.

The Yarnspirations company has developed a new format for the ball of yarn itself – a lifeline-shaped ring called an O’Go which it says is less prone to tangles. O’Go is available under different brands and in a range of colors.

Myrh and Alm say independently produced dyes and yarns tell stories that make a knitted piece more valuable to its wearer.

Myrh loves the trip the dyes take her. Often times her best finds, she says, are “happy accidents,” and she tries to write everything down quickly. “I lost many treasures thinking I would remember and record them later. I didn’t remember, and the most beautiful coppery red escaped me for years, only to be found by chance a few months later.

Copyright © La Presse Associée. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

]]>
Craftsmanship: Independent designers get creative with yarns and dyes https://BellaKnitting.com/craftsmanship-independent-designers-get-creative-with-yarns-and-dyes/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/craftsmanship-independent-designers-get-creative-with-yarns-and-dyes/

When you see a cute handmade sweater, you know it took a long time to make.

Knitting or crocheting is only part of it. (A fun online calculator at www.lovecrafts.com estimates how long it would take from a basic scarf to a blanket, baby booties or patterned garment; figure between 20 and 80 hours.)

Before that, however, there are those who make the threads. Independent artisans are making new things with wool and other fibers, including recycled plastic, as well as dyes.

Samantha Myrhe, owner of RavensWood Fiber Co. in Nova Scotia, Canada, started a dozen years ago with a few sheep, and her third generation of lambs were sheared this fall. She sells her yarns online and at local markets, and gives her quirky dyes quirky names, like Sea Glass, a dreamy water-hued blend; Fireflies, in the starry colors of the night sky; and Autumn Drive, evoking a ride through an autumn forest.

“Dyeing is chemistry,” she says. “Although the process we use is a simple heat and acid-vinegar process to fix colors, the underlying chemistry involves the bonding of a color molecule to a wool molecule. More or less molecules , more or less intense color.”

She found that using water from the local municipal system created unpredictable colors, so she turned to well water instead. Yet there is an element of luck: more rain means more minerals in the water. “More minerals mean my reds can be more orange, my blacks break up and go gold. It’s crazy,” she says.

Myrrh has a good group of reliable and “stable” colors, but also what the indie dye world calls OOAK: One of a Kinds.

“The magic of what the dye gods gave me that day,” she says.

Different fibers take dye in different ways. Alpaca hues tend towards pastels because they don’t absorb as much color. Nylon and silk absorb dye and, when mixed with merino wool, provide a beautiful depth of color.

Some dyers are exploring other types of wool, including yak, cashmere and Australian Polwarth sheep, which has a strong, silky character good for many woven projects.

Wool gets high marks for durability; as the International Wool Textile Organization notes, it is renewable, biodegradable and recyclable. Around the world, many farms, studios and workshops produce yarn and other textile products using techniques with low environmental impact, including recycling water and using little or no additives.

Britt-Marie Alm, who runs Love Fest Fibers in San Francisco, offers small-batch yarns from sustainably operated mills on the West Coast, Nepal and Tibet. Alm has had a decades-long love of Tibetan culture ever since he joined a community service project at a local high school. She learned spinning and weaving techniques from Tibetan artisans and now supports several women-led collectives there and in the United States.

Her soft, chunky yarns include Color Core, in which she weaves ethically sourced merino wool around colorful organic cotton fiber; the result looks like a woolly Twizzler. Alm came up with the idea during the pandemic.

“I was spending more time indoors, as we all were, and I was captivated by the incredible weaves made by customers exploring the inside of our yarn,” she says. “Their techniques centered around cutting the wires to show the inner cross section, and it was mesmerizing – the textures and color gradients were just stunning.

Along with her partners at the Washington State factory — a mother-daughter team that also breeds a few alpacas — she developed seven Color Core colorways.

Love Fest also offers a naturally fluffy yak yarn called kullu, which looks like cashmere, without the sheep shearing.

“The last few years have seen a reinvention of what yarn can do,” Alm says. She cites a range of knitted and crocheted homewares, from baskets and rugs to pillows and poufs. The chunky yarn and huge stitches that make these projects possible, she says, are more than just visually striking.

“It’s also very rewarding to be able to complete a project so quickly. It has captured the imagination of a new generation of fiber artists who learn to knit a large basket, then continue to explore macrame and weaving” , she says.

Sustainable options for yarn now also include recycled linen and plastic fiber.

“I grew up crocheting and knitting so many polyester and acrylic yarns; it seemed such a shame that more recycled materials were not being used,” says Alm.

She worked with her mill to create ReLove, a fiber that blends plastic water bottles with merino to create a soft, chunky yarn available in colors like denim, curry, fog and leche. The sets contain 40 meters of yarn, which saves about 10 plastic bottles from landfills, she says.

Other notable independent operations include farm/mill combos like Red Hill Fiber Mill in Taswell, Indiana, which raises alpacas, runs educational tours, and spins and sells yarn and wool products gleaned from their herd. Lydia Christiansen’s Abundant Earth Fiber, on Whidbey Island north of Seattle, features wool spun from East Frisian sheep that graze just down the road from her mill.

Yarn enthusiast Michelle Thymmons has compiled a list of popular Instagram yarn dyers in North America and Europe on her website www.vamicreations.com. They include a multigenerational family at Bumblebee Farm in Davis, Illinois, who raise sheep and rabbits, dye and make their own knitting fibers, and run Harry Potter, “Lord of the Dead”-themed yarn clubs. Rings” and “Game of Thrones”. . ”

Knitwear and pattern designer Norman Schwarze in Munich, Germany has a global compilation at www.nimble-needles.com that includes Vivid Wool outside of Reykjavik, Iceland; Son Wishbone in South Africa and The Blue Brick in Ontario, Canada.

The company Yarnspirations has developed a new format for the ball itself – a ring-shaped lifesaver called O’Go which it says is less prone to tangles. O’Go is available under different brands and in a range of colours.

Myrhe and Alm say that independently made dyes and yarns tell stories that make a knitted piece more valuable to the wearer.

Myrhe loves the journey that the dyes take her on. Often her best finds, she says, are “happy accidents,” and she tries to jot everything down quickly. “I’ve lost many treasures thinking I’ll remember and save later. I didn’t remember, and the most beautiful coppery red eluded me for years, only to be found accidentally a few months later. late.”

]]>
Towards recyclable composite materials https://BellaKnitting.com/towards-recyclable-composite-materials/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 12:23:15 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/towards-recyclable-composite-materials/

Researchers at the University of Limerick are working to improve the recyclability of composite materials used in the construction, aerospace and automotive industries.

The next-generation recyclable composites are being developed by Project Vibes, a pan-European consortium of which the University of Limerick is the sole academic partner.

The project aims to improve the recyclability of composite materials through greener, more cost-effective and non-toxic recycling technology and involves scientists from UL’s Bernal Institute, with a duration of 48 months and a budget of almost 5.3 million euros.

Composites are known for their high end properties and are basically fiber reinforced polymers or resins. They are deployed in advanced engineering applications for their high mechanical strength, corrosion and chemical resistance, durability and light weight, which is especially important for aerospace and electric vehicles.

However, these materials are currently not recyclable.

“The work at the University of Limerick is specifically focused on the development of sustainable fibers for the reinforcement of next-generation recyclable composite materials,” explained the project leader at UL and senior lecturer at the School of Engineering, the Dr Maurice Collins. “UL researchers will also be involved in developing recycling technology and testing new composites. These new composites could eliminate waste in end-of-life composites and create a circular ecosystem for materials.

The Vibes approach focuses on the controlled separation and recovery of composite material components by custom bio-based bonding materials.

“These new composite materials will be entirely bio-based, which will reduce environmental impact by reducing the use of raw materials, harmful chemicals and landfill,” said Dr Collins. “The resulting composite materials with intrinsic recycling properties will be validated for optimal performance and evaluated on a cost ratio with applications in three successful industrial sectors such as aeronautics, construction and naval.

“The green recycling technology will be designed and implemented as a pilot in semi-industrial settings to separate and recover composite components as new raw materials for new product development.”

Vibes is made up of a multitude of partners in seven EU Member States, as well as research and technology organisations, businesses, SMEs and public bodies. It is funded by the Bio-Based Industries Joint Undertaking under the European Union’s framework program for research and innovation, Horizon 2020.

www.ul.ie

]]>
Australian fashion has a problem when it comes to sourcing raw materials https://BellaKnitting.com/australian-fashion-has-a-problem-when-it-comes-to-sourcing-raw-materials/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 04:06:10 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/australian-fashion-has-a-problem-when-it-comes-to-sourcing-raw-materials/

For every brand making a sustainability claim, there is a tremendous amount of offshoring happening behind the scenes.

Earlier this year, the Australian Fashion Council released its 2021 Fashion Industry Report. Beyond reflections on the devastating effects of COVID on the local industry, and a bit of posturing about the significant financial and cultural contributions of Australian fashion, I noticed a rather disturbing statistic languishing among the colorful graphics and quotes. bold: the fact that only 29 percent of our local businesses source at least some of their raw materials from local suppliers.

“The EY 2021 Australian Fashion and Textile Industry Survey found that 88% of companies design their products in Australia, but only 29% have sourced some of their materials from local suppliers,” details the report. “There is a major opportunity for greater domestic supply. Every million dollars of industrial production potentially relocated to Australia – if this is commercially viable – could generate an economic return of around $ 1.2 million.


For more fashion news, shoots, articles and reports, visit our Fashion section.


Besides the obvious economic benefits of offshoring our raw materials and manufacturing industries, there is also a huge sustainability benefit in such a move – after all, air cargo and transportation pollution adds a sustainability cost to the economy. companies that are desperately trying to improve their green credentials.

So, can we really talk about sustainable local fashion in a credible way, when only 29% of the raw materials come from Australia? There are many challenges for local brands when it comes to sourcing local raw materials and sustainable fibers. As customers increasingly demand that their products be made in Australia, the answer isn’t as simple as “Okay, let’s do more of our fabrics here”. For small brands in particular, the issues are complex and varied.

What are the obstacles to the local supply of raw materials?

“The obstacle would be to be able to allow me to stock up on what I want”, explains Suzan Dlouhy, founder of SZN, a small label based in Melbourne.A lot of times I find something really good, and these companies don’t necessarily want to work with me because I’m too small. Their minimum order quantity can take me out of the game altogether.

During our conversation, Suzan tells me a story of trying to buy a small amount of knitting from a local mill, who told her that they need a minimum order of 1000 yards. This is the reason why many local manufacturers turn to overseas suppliers, as they often do not impose such onerous minimum order requirements.

Even the possibility of participating in a big order with other small manufacturers gets complicated – if you order something unique, do you really want five other Melbourne designers to make similar items from the same knit, over the course of? the same season?

It is clear that Australia has gaping holes in the raw materials processing industry. Maybe some cotton isn’t made here, but the resulting organic cotton fabric is. Or maybe local manufacturers can’t source a certain type of textile locally and have to look to overseas suppliers. This is a problem that often also complicates the highly regarded “Australian made” label – a label that does not necessarily guarantee that 100% of the processes have been completed in Australia.

For starters, the current code is confusing at best – there are six groups of representations, each with their own criteria for compliance, including the most frequently used terms Product of Australia, Made in Australia, Grown in Australia and Made in Australia.

It’s fair to say that the average consumer wouldn’t know the subtle differences between the six groups – and even within these specific groups, the criteria never require that 100% of the product adhere to the label, only “virtually all”. “Or” “significant components.

Support the onhoring cycle

So while even ‘Australian Made’ certification does not guarantee 100% of products made in Australia, how are consumers supposed to support a local industry that appears to be struggling to survive?

“The biggest opportunity is local manufacturing and supporting smart offshoring,” says Elle Roseby, CEO of Country Road. “80% of our customers want to support Australian manufacturing. We send cotton and wool to Vietnam and China to be spun and woven when it could be done here. We all talk about reducing emissions but the current commodity model conflicts with that, we have to support the offshoring cycle.

“For the industry to thrive and be more sustainable, we need to invest in creating jobs in local manufacturing, as well as in technology and sustainability. We have to treat it as a serious industry if we are really going to attract the brightest minds and spur real innovation, ”she explains.

“Australia has a very small old-fashioned industry of making its own fabric,” says Kalaurie Karl-Crooks, creative director and designer of local brand Kalaurie. There are only a handful of knitting factories and weaving factories. It is actually quite difficult to source the tissue grown and ground in Australia. What we are still doing here is very basic.

Bringing the conversation back to sustainability is key to reviving the local raw materials and manufacturing industry here in Australia – especially given the huge shift in momentum we’ve seen in the industry towards labeling and packaging. sustainable marketing. However, transparency continues to be the key to achieving this and consumers should be careful when looking for products made in Australia.

“The fiber is made into yarn, the yarn into fabric and the fabric into clothing – that can literally be the number of times it crosses the ocean,” says Suzan. “So if you buy ‘Australian cotton’ from, say, Kmart, there is no guarantee how many times it has crossed the ocean. It’s not very clear – it’s not the transparency that people want in the supply chain.

Suzan’s point echoes my recent call for blockchain technology to help with tracking and transparency in the fashion industry. Going even further than ethical manufacturing tracing or raw material sourcing, blockchain could also potentially provide industry with an automated sustainability calculator.

Imagine being able to scan two competing garments via a QR code on a tag, and see the relative carbon footprint of both at the same time, calculated automatically by an algorithm running in the background.

Unfortunately, this kind of technology seems far away – after all, historically the fashion industry has not been good at integrating into the tech world, despite the huge opportunity for blockchain to respond to all of these. pressing ethical issues with far fewer resources. – in a heavy way.

“When we decided in the late ’80s and mid’ 90s to source more clothing from overseas and our industries were shutting down, that’s when I think we have limited our technological progress in fashion, ”explains Suzan. “Because if you are a manufacturing company, you are constantly improving yourself with your profits. You can get the next best machine… Our manufacturing has stalled.

So what is the answer to our raw material supply and sustainability issues?

Can we just invest the money in up-to-date technology and training, and hope for the best? “Personally, I think the industry could be revived through grassroots movements, job creation in the sector and awareness,” Kalaurie says.

“A lot of people don’t realize that Australia barely makes fabric and that although the raw materials are grown here, the fabric isn’t actually produced here. Relaunching jobs in this textile industry would be huge to pass the knowledge on to the next generation of fabric technicians to continue transforming Australian raw materials into fabrics made in Australia and then into products made in Australia.

“[But] I don’t think there is anything sustainable about the continued production of products. For me, sustainability is about making do with what you have to create something desirable with as little impact as possible, ”she notes.

This is something Courtney Holm, founder of circular label A.BCH, is also passionate about: the idea that the fashion industry needs to look at its production and start there, if it is to be taken seriously when it comes to sustainability. As part of the community she has built locally, she resells raw materials to other small manufacturers when large quantities of orders would otherwise deprive them of the market.

Interestingly, at the same time, she’s working with the community center and production house, The Social Studio, on a fascinating new project that could change the game of local raw materials.

“They’re doing a big study right now in Victoria on the raw materials that are in people’s warehouses – it’s more like a surplus material situation. We’ve been working on this idea of ​​how to move some of this material forward and actually help with this minimum orders problem.

“There are so many good raw materials made in Australia – hundreds of thousands of meters – that sit in warehouses unused. It’s a really crazy problem that people don’t really know about. There are so many ways that there could be better solutions for small business because they are either lower priced or minimum order quantity to make these really good and big steps in sustainability.

Ultimately, the approach will have to be multidimensional. While investing in our raw materials and local manufacturing capabilities may reduce the impacts of transportation on our sustainability goals, it is a short-term solution that only considers part of a circular environmental impact chain.

“It’s very difficult, and unless you’re totally circular, I don’t think you can claim to be sustainable,” says Kalaurie. “No brand is perfect, there is always room to grow – but doing the best you can is important.”

Learn more about circular fashion here.

]]>
Circular Systems, Tintex Launches Premium Knitwear Collection Using Low Impact Materials and Dyeing Technology https://BellaKnitting.com/circular-systems-tintex-launches-premium-knitwear-collection-using-low-impact-materials-and-dyeing-technology/ Tue, 28 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://BellaKnitting.com/circular-systems-tintex-launches-premium-knitwear-collection-using-low-impact-materials-and-dyeing-technology/

LOS ANGELES, Calif .– September 16, 2021 – Circular Systems has partnered with Tintex, a sustainable textiles company based in Portugal, to launch a premium knitwear collection designed with high quality Texloop ™ RCOT ™ recycled cotton yarns Primo using Tintex Colorau ™ natural dye. Treatment, some of the least impacting materials and treatments available on the market. The collaboration sets a new precedent for the textile industry using a revolutionary patented process that replaces synthetic dyes with natural extracts and combines with ground fabric with yarns containing up to 50% recycled cotton.

Circular Systems and Tintex have teamed up to bring this essential solution to the fashion industry. Dyeing is one of the most polluting aspects of the textile industry. The World Bank estimates that 17 to 20 percent of industrial water pollution comes from the dyeing of textiles and the finishing treatments applied to the fabrics. Some 72 toxic chemicals have been identified in water from textile dye alone, 30 of which cannot be removed. The Colorau natural dyeing process incorporates naturally occurring compounds like plants into substrates to produce a functional, ecological and sustainable technology. This technology also focuses on its environmental impact by eliminating potentially toxic effluents generated by synthetic dyes.

The use of low temperatures in the dyeing process and the substitution of traditional auxiliaries with natural alternatives also contributes to the overall reduction of the impacts of the process. There is no sacrifice in color durability, as Colorau focuses on natural extracts with inherent color fastness properties that can also be antimicrobial. This unique technology is designed to mimic the beauty and authenticity of nature. The collection will be available in the colors Thyme, Chestnut, Gambier and Morus Tinctoria.

Texloop RCOT Primo recycled cotton is Circular Systems’ most widely adopted impact solution, reaching millions of consumers to date. With its own innovative GRS classification from Textile Exchange (PD0067), RCOT Primo are the highest quality ring spun yarns with up to 50 percent recycled cotton with a multitude of applications in fashion products. This fabric collection marks the first time that Circular Systems has partnered with a leading partner factory like Tintex to execute a complete circular material solution, from raw materials to finished fabrics with a natural dye.

“We have admired Tintex’s work for a long time. It is one of the most sophisticated knitwear and dye finishing plants in Europe, with a strong commitment to creating low impact processes and products, ”said Isaac Nichelson, CEO and co-founder of Circular Systems. “We have worked with the great team at Tintex for years. In the latest project, we are delighted to have combined our finest Texloop RCOT Primo recycled cotton with their Colorau process to produce a beautiful collection of knit fabrics, with both durable colors and circular design fabrics.

“This collaboration with Circular Systems is a great example of how the industry is evolving to become a synergistic and integrated platform of ideas. Through a co-creation process, we put the consumer at the center of the business. We celebrate how our teams have aligned to achieve this common goal of bringing the best technologies to market. said Ricardo Silva, CEO of TINTEX.

The collection is available for purchase through Tintex and can be viewed on their website. The collection will also be presented to commercial buyers at Premiere Vision Paris from September 21 to 23. Tintex booth number 3B4 3C3.

Posted on September 28, 2021

Source: Tintex

]]>