Pictured: Recently married pilot instructor, 24, killed in crash near Alabama airport

The U.S. Air Force said on Sunday that a Japanese Air Self Defense Force flight instructor and student pilot were killed when a training plane crashed in Alabama.

The Air Force released the name of the instructor who died when the T-38C Talon trainer plane crashed on Friday near Montgomery, Alabama.

He has been identified as Scot Ames Jr., a 24-year-old instructor pilot with the 50th Flight Training Squadron at Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. He was originally from Beijing, Indiana.

The name of the student pilot is not published at this time and will be provided in accordance with the Japanese process.

Instructor pilot Scott Ames Jr, 24 (pictured with his wife Audra and their dog) died when a T-38C Talon trainer crashed on Friday near Montgomery, Ala, killing him and a Japanese trainee pilot.

Columbus Air Force Base is home to the 14th Flight Training Wing. The wing’s mission is the specialized training of undergraduate pilots.

“We are a close family and the loss of two of our teammates affects us all,” Colonel Seth Graham, 14 Flight Training Wing commander, said at a press conference on Saturday.

“The strength of our bond is what will help us get through it together. My thoughts and prayers are with their families, friends and teammates today. ‘

The cause of the incident is still under investigation.

According to his wedding website, Mr Ames married his wife Audra in June 2020. Tributes to the pilot poured in from well-wishers, expressing their condolences and tributes to the young man.

Writing her own tribute, Audra Ames posted on the platform: “My heart is in my throat knowing that the last time I saw you watching you go on Friday… and the last time we spoke it was was telling me that you loved me and that you would FaceTime me when you landed.

“Thank you for making me the happiest woman in the world. Please watch over me and give me and the rest of us the strength to somehow move forward in this unimaginable tragedy.

The pilots were flying on a training mission when the plane crashed around 5:30 p.m. Friday near Dannelly Field in Montgomery.

Columbus Air Force Base is home to the 14th Flight Training Wing.  The wing's mission is the specialized training of undergraduate pilots.  Pictured: Scot Ames with a fighter plane

Columbus Air Force Base is home to the 14th Flight Training Wing. The wing’s mission is the specialized training of undergraduate pilots. Pictured: Scot Ames with a fighter plane

Marshall Taggart, executive director of the Montgomery Regional Airport, told media the plane crashed in a wooded area near the airport. Taggart said there were homes in the area, but the plane did not hit any structures.

He told the WSFA that no structures were hit by the plane, which crashed near a mobile home park.

Taggart also revealed the flight path of the plane, which originated in Columbus, Mississippi, and was heading towards Tallahassee, Florida.

Fox news reports that the aircraft was a two-seater T-38, which is typically used for training by the Air Force or the Navy.

The names of the victims have yet to be released as the investigation begins

The names of the victims have yet to be released as the investigation begins

The WSFA reports that vehicles bearing the Air Force emblem were seen arriving at the crash site.

There are Air Force bases located in both the home city and the destination city.

The aircraft is believed to belong to the 14th Flight Training Wing at Columbus Air Force Base.

In October, 30-year-old U.S. Navy Lt. Rhiannon Ross and 24-year-old Coast Guard Ensign were killed in a plane crash in Foley, Alabama.

Pictured: A T-38 jet, the model flown before crashing in Alabama on Friday

Pictured: A T-38 jet, the model flown before crashing in Alabama on Friday

The crash missed ground structures, including a nearby mobile home park

The crash missed ground structures, including a nearby mobile home park

Their T-6B Texan II trainer crashed in a residential area, setting a house and several cars on fire.

No injuries were reported on the ground.

An Air Force T-38 Talon supersonic trainer crashed near Columbus Air Force Base in May 2018, although both pilots safely ejected from the plane.

In November 2019, two T-38 talon jets were involved in an incident during a training mission at Vance Air Force Base in Oklahoma, which killed two.

About Tracy G. Larimore

Check Also

Girls sexually assaulted by fencing instructor in Bridgewater: cops

BRIDGEWATER, NJ – A Somerset County fencing coach has been charged with sexually assaulting girls …