Harakeke to headline a show focusing on fiber arts and crafts

FibreEd is an educational festival for creatives like knitting tutor Debbie Dawson, left, and her student Lilly Pomeroy.

VANESSA LAURIE / Stuff

FibreEd is an educational festival for creatives like knitting tutor Debbie Dawson, left, and her student Lilly Pomeroy.

An educational festival celebrating all things fiber is on its way to Taranaki.

From July 15-17, FibreEd will take place in New Plymouth and has attracted interest from around 200 Aotearoa creatives who have registered to attend.

The event offers classes for those who have signed up, as well as practice sessions for the public involving crafts like knitting, crocheting and weaving.

A total of 35 classes are scheduled involving 19 tutors, while 25 traders will display their creations for sale.

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In addition to more traditional crafts, there will be dyeing and photography workshops, as well as knitting with t-shirt fabric and a tutorial on sashiko mending, which is a Japanese technique.

Creative Fiber NZ is the national body of over 3000 artists, with FibreEd hosted by Taranaki Creative Fibre, which has around 120 members.

This is the first time an event like this has been held in the region in 15 years, and three years since there was a national hui, due to two Covid-19 related rally cancellations. consecutive years.

Beth Pottinger-Hockings has been a member of New Plymouth Creative Fiber for approximately 20 years and serves on the craft show organizing committee.

Although felting is her specialty, she said linen work is going to be the focus of FibreEd, with 58 pieces submitted for the show.

Harakeke will be the focus of an event that celebrates the use of fiber materials in arts and crafts.  (File photo)

MARK TAYLOR/Stuff

Harakeke will be the focus of an event that celebrates the use of fiber materials in arts and crafts. (File photo)

“We focus a lot on celebrating harakeke,” she said.

Pottinger-Hockings said there has been renewed interest in using natural fibers for arts and crafts.

Besides the appeal of creating a one-of-a-kind piece of handmade decor, it was also increasingly a way to support mental health, she said.

“There is now research that says these things are good for stress.”

An indirect benefit to the group would be bringing new members into the fold, Pottinger-Hockings added.

FibreEd will take place at Sacred Heart Girls’ College in New Plymouth and the cost of admission is $5, with free admission for children.

About Tracy G. Larimore

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